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Posts on social media have said Rawmarsh Community School sent around 40 pupils home to change after writing “R.I.P Bradley” on their school uniform.

On the day of the six year old’s funeral the kids had wrote the tribute on their tops to to try and raise money for the family.

Jay Haywood, one of the parents, posted after her daughter and other pupils were reprimanded by the school:

“Rawmarsh comprehensive I hope you’re proud of yourselves.

“Sent around 40 children home from school for writing Bradley Lowery R.I.P on their tops and trying to raise money for the family.”

But the pupils were told to go home and change according to parents

Bradley was just 6 when he died and had been battling a rare form of cancer.

Bradley’s Fight, his official charity, has raised more than £1 million and includes large donations from several top flight football clubs.

He inspired the nation and gripped the heart of football star Jermaine Defoe, who flew back from Spain to attend the funeral.

Helen O’Brien, Headteacher of Rawmarsh Community School, has since apologised to parents in a statement on the school website.

Ms O’Brien said: “A number of schools nationally have today asked children to come in non-uniform in memory of the passing of Bradley Lowery.

“As a school we are deeply saddened by his death and have taken the decision to raise funds for the Bradley Lowery Foundation in his memory when we hold our annual sponsored walk for charity on October 6.

“This year all the proceeds from this walk will go to the Foundation. Last year we raised £4712.36, so we are hopeful of raising a similar amount this year for the charity.

“As a school we ensure that you are given ample advance notice for all our non-uniform days.

“However, a small minority of students did arrive at school today with messages written on their school shirts.

“These students were either sent home to change or asked to cover their shirt with their school jumper in accordance with the school uniform policy.

“We apologise if this has caused any confusion with parents, carers or students.”

 

 

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